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Anger Iceberg Worksheet

Sara Quitlag

On this page, we will provide you with an Anger Iceberg Worksheet. It will help you to know that your anger is not one dimensional, rather it is a complex emotion that needs to be catered effectively.

What is Anger Iceberg Worksheet?

The Anger Iceberg is a concept that describes anger like an iceberg: Above the sea, what you see is the visible "tip" of the anger which is covert behaviour that involves yelling, stomping feet, and temper tantrums. What we are unable to see is beneath the surface: The other mixed emotions, like frustration, hopelessness, disappointment, pain, jealousy, loneliness, or fear.

How Anger Iceberg Worksheet will help?

Anger is often described as a secondary emotion since it masks other raw emotions underneath it. By understanding the concept of the iceberg you will be able to see the hidden dreams, desires and unsaid emotions. The emotions that are unanswered and unattended, by attending those emotions you will become free and relaxed. It will teach us to better understand the complex emotions and how they interact with each other. 

Instructions on how to use the Anger Iceberg Worksheet

When you’re angry, ask yourself these questions to gain a better understanding of your anger iceberg:

  • How am I acting right now? How does my current display of anger mask another emotion that I feel?
  • If I were a friend or someone else and in this situation, what might I also be feeling? Other than anger
  • Have there been times in the past where I felt angry in a situation, but later realized I was feeling something else?

You can download this worksheet here.

Conclusion

On this page we provided you with an Anger Iceberg Worksheet) which hopefully helped you to know that your anger is not one dimensional, rather it is a complex emotion that needs to be catered effectively.

If you have any questions or comments please let us know.

Resources

The worksheets on this site should not be used in place of professional advice from a mental health professional. 

You should always seek help from a mental health professional or medical professional. We are not providing any advice or recommendations here.

There are various resources where you can seek help.

You could use Online-Therapy if you feel you need counselling.

If you live in the UK then this list of resources from the NHS may help you find help.
If you live in the USA then you could contact Mental Health America who may be able to assist you further.

Sara Quitlag

Sara Quitlag is an Applied Psychologist, with a deep interest in psychopathology and neuropsychology and how psychology impacts and permeates every aspect of our environment. She has worked in Clinical settings (as Special Ed. Counselor, CBT Therapist) and has contributed at local Universities as a Faculty member from time to time. She has a graduate degree in English Literature and feels very connected to how literature and psychology interact. She feels accountable and passionate about making a "QUALITY" contribution to the overall global reform and well-being. She actively seeks out opportunities where she can spread awareness and make a positive difference across the globe for the welfare of our global society.